Archive: Nov 2013

  1. Recognizing November as National Family Caregivers Month

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    On October 31st, 2013, President Barack Obama issued a presidential proclamation recognizing November as National Family Caregivers Month.  In his proclamation, the President discussed the importance of spotlighting the more than 60 million Americans who have answered the selfless call to care for our nation’s seniors and persons with disabilities and illnesses.  The role these caregivers play is incredibly valuable to our healthcare system, and undeniably significant to those who benefit from their tireless work.  Caregivers wear many hats, and the juggling act of balancing these sometimes conflicting roles can be challenging.  Recognizing these heroes is imperative in supporting them and allowing them to realize that their efforts are respected.

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  2. “It’s All In Your Head!” – Living with an Invisible Disability

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    “It’s all in your head!” is one example of the negative reactions those who live with chronic pain and disability experience from those who fail to understand that a person can have a disability, but appear physically well.  It is estimated that 96% of people who live with an illness have an illness that is invisible.  Those who suffer with an invisible disability do not use wheelchairs, walkers, canes, or other assistive devices, and may look perfectly healthy, from what the eyes can see.  This week, I decided to shine a spotlight on invisible disabilities because I do not believe that there is a great sense of understanding or strong awareness about the struggles those who suffer from chronic illnesses endure.

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  3. Finding Our Missing Children with Special Needs

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    I decided to title this article, “Finding Our Missing Children with Special Needs,” because the news have covered numerous stories across the nation regarding children with disabilities being reported as missing from their homes and schools, with some cases ending tragically. As a person with a disability who may one day have a child with special needs, this trend saddens me on so many levels.  A missing child is an unimaginable circumstance for any family to endure, but when a missing child is one with special needs, the situation is even more dire in the urgency to finding that child as quickly as possible due to the communication and health limitations that child may have.  Today, we are going to take an in-depth view of the statistics surrounding this unique population of missing children, and what can be done to decrease the number of children with disabilities reported missing.

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