Archive: Dec 2014

  1. Top 5 for 2014: Ramp Your Voice! Blog Articles in Review

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    To say that the Ramp Your Voice! blog has been a popular hot spot in 2014 would be an understatement – the website had 9,411 (and counting!) views for this year, which was a 476% increase from 2013.  I was quite surprised at the high number views and shares for many articles on the blog, which reaffirmed that the articles written undeniably have a purpose and are imperative to the disabled community.

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  2. Why I Can’t Breathe as a Black Disabled Woman in America

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    Strong Language Advisory:  This article will contain strong language that may not be suitable for certain ages and audiences.  Though I have never used derogatory terms/slurs in any blog posts on here, I felt that I would make an exception for this one.  I will be spelling out the “N-word” in its entirety in this piece.  Why?  Because for 400+ years, those of African descent in this country did not have the “political correctness” privilege to hear or read a milked down version of a word that has been used to demonized, dehumanized, and established an inferiority complex towards them.  I am not, and have never been, a person to shy away from controversy; the use of the term is not for shock value – I am a great writer, and I do not need to use offensive terms to gain attention to anything I write.  I have chosen to spell out this small, yet powerful six-letter word to emphasize how devastating, disgusting, and disempowering it is to know that some individuals view your being and existence solely by the definition of that word, and to make those who have issues with the word uncomfortable.  I want you to be uncomfortable so that you will know what it is like to live in a world where that word exists.  It should anger and sicken you, and if it does when you read that word in this post, then I have completed my job as a writer for making you take the blinders off and see the world in full technicolor, and not through the rose-tinted glasses we like to wear in our erroneously dubbed “post-racial society.”

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  3. What’s In A Name?: Attitudes About Calling a Disability a “Disease” Versus a “Disorder” or “Condition”

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    “It is not what you are called, it is what you answer to.”

    Using the correct language and terminology to describe one’s disability is a top concern for those in the disability community, and I witnessed that over the weekend during a semi-heated discussion in a Facebook group for those with OI (Osteogenesis Imperfecta).

    I saw a group member post a status about her dislike of calling OI a “disease” versus a “disorder” or “condition;” she felt that the former had a negative perception, and that folks who heard it when one’s describing OI would gain an inaccurate understanding of what OI truly was.  That statement opened up a whole can of worms; there were a few folks who had their undies in a bunch from having their opinions refuted, while others stated their views in a more civil manner.

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  4. Tools You Can Use series: DomesticShelters.org – New Resource for Those Experiencing Domestic Violence

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    Though it may be the most wonderful time of the year, the Holiday season can be dangerous for individuals and families impacted by domestic violence.  Those who work in this field explains that the increase of incidences during the holidays is exacerbated by the build up of anger and stress, which accompanies the season.  The holiday season also marks the time of year when children experience domestic violence at the highest rates seen.  It may be a joyous celebration for many of us; however, we cannot forget or fail to protect and assist those who are enduring brutal, and sadly, potential life-ending, abuse.

    A few weeks ago, I came across a post on the Creative Social Worker Tumblr page spotlighting a new tool to assist in finding shelter and support for individuals and families experiencing domestic violence.  Being that I wrote an article on this subject in October discussing the prevalence of disabled women and domestic violence, I knew that I had to share this resource on the Tools You Can Use series.

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