Archive: Jul 2016

  1. #GetWokeADA26: Disabled People of Color Speak Out, Part 1

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    White background with black text that reads: #GetWokeADA26 Disabled People of Color Speak Out, Part One. Vilissa Thompson and Alice Wong. On the left-hand side is an image of a Black Wonder Woman character in a wheelchair. She has rainbow wristbands and a golden lasso by her wheel. Image: Mike Mort @MikeeMort. On the lower right-hand side: Full report: RampYouVoice.com DisabilityVisibilityProject.com

    #GetWokeADA26:  Disabled People of Color Speak Out, Part One
    by Vilissa Thompson and Alice Wong

    Introduction

    On July 5th, we published the #GetWokeADA26 Call for Stories, asking for disabled people to share how the Americans with Disabilities Act has impacted their life experiences, gaps in the mandate that fail to support the unique challenges of disabled people or color, and the need for intersectionality in the disability community and how the lack of visibility affects this subgroup.  

    As disabled women of color, we believe the disability community needs to ”get woke” on race, racism, and intersectionality.  The work of getting “woke” can be hard, awkward, and uncomfortable, but this is something disabled people of color expect and deserve.

    For #GetWokeADA26, there were enormous responses to this project through the countless reblogging, sharing, and retweeting across the major social media platforms by disabled advocates, allies, and organizations.  In the two weeks that the Call was open, 50 individuals representing various people of color communities, disability types, ages, and sexual identities and orientations answered our request to share, and we were not disappointed by the rich, emotional, and direct responses to each question on our survey.  The data we were able to collect was extraordinary – there is so much that it is impossible to include everything in our summary, but we will capture the most poignantwerful and moving points of view shared.

    What follows is a description of the themes of the survey questions askedn overview of the survey questions, the representation makeup ofa description of our participantsrespondents, and a breakdown of the responses by specific topics.

    White background with black text that reads: #GetWokeADA26 “I am black. I am a woman. I am disabled. I am magic.” —Joi Meyer Brewer. On the left-hand side is an image of a Black Wonder Woman character in a wheelchair. She has rainbow wristbands and a golden lasso by her wheel. Image: Mike Mort @MikeeMort. On the lower right-hand side: Full report: RampYouVoice.com DisabilityVisibilityProject.com

     

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  2. Celebrating the 3rd Anniversary of Ramp Your Voice!

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    RYV Turns 3

    WINNSBORO, SC (July 19th, 2016) – Today marks the 3rd anniversary of the establishment of Ramp Your Voice!  I am tremendously proud of the progress and reach the platform has accomplished in the last year, especially within the past 6 months alone.  Some of the milestones reached I did not think could happen so soon, but I am very proud of what has transpired for the brand, and for myself.   (more…)

  3. Black America is Hurting & Tired. White America, Do You Even Care?

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    BlackLivesMatter

    I am tired.

    Black America is tired.  

    We are at our boiling point in this country.  The police violence that transpired within the last week set off a deep fire within all of us with the murders of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge and Philando Castile in Minnesota.  To see two Black men murdered during encounters with the police in such savage regards was sickening to watch and comprehend.  

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  4. #GetWokeADA26: Call for Stories by Disabled People of Color

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    It is with absolute delight that I announce the collaboration established between Ramp Your Voice! and Disability Visibility Project to celebrate the 26th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.  Now is the time to “get woke” about how the ADA as impacted disabled Americans, particularly those who are of color and disabled.  The plight of disabled Americans of color cannot, and will not, go unnoticed within disability advocacy – this partnership allows for our voices to be visible and ramped up when we reflect on how successful the Act has been for our rights and lives.  

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