Disability Observances

  1. ADA Generation: Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (Part 1)

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    It was 25 years ago today that one of the most influential, life-changing disability policies was signed into law, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  For those who were born during the 80s and 90s, disabled Millennials also known as ADA Generation, it is hard to phantom living in a world without this mandate that guarantees our rights to equal access to education, healthcare, transportation; as well as necessary accommodations and accessibility in utilizing services and resources in our communities.

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  1. Keeping It 100: The Truth About Black Women & Our Mental Health

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    July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and I felt it to be imperative to spotlight the struggles Black women have when it comes to our mental health status, and gaining the support and help we need.  This is the second time I have discussed this topic on the blog, and I aim to keep the dialogue going until stigma and shame are no longer forced upon those of us who live with mental illness.

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  1. African Americans & Our Health: Spotlighting the 30th Anniversary of National Minority Health Month

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    MinorityHealth

    April is National Minority Health Month.  This observance aims to raise awareness about the health disparities that continue to affect racial and ethnic minorities.  This year marks the 30th anniversary of the establishment of this health awareness focus, and I thought it would be fitting to discuss the health status of African Americans, and share my own plight in taking charge in maintaining good health and a healthy lifestyle.

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  1. Unintentional Cultural Appropriation: The Miseducation of #NoShameDay

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    MiseducationOfNoShameDay

    What you are about to read is not what I had intended to share regarding my participation in #NoShameDay on Friday, April 17th, 2015.  I had anticipated discussing how empowering it was to share my story about growing up disabled, and not having any shame about the life I was given.  That all changed when I realized that #NoShameDay was unintentionally appropriated by someone in our community, and my excitement about my participation turned into intense anger and disappointment.

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  1. ADA Generation Ramping Our Voices: What the 25th Anniversary of the ADA Means to Us

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    ADAGeneration1

    This week marks exactly 4 months until we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  The impact of the ADA on the lives of disabled Americans is undeniable, especially for those who are members of my generation, the Millennials.  Disabled Millennials, dubbed the ADA Generation, came into age under the enactment of the legislation.  The legal requirements under the ADA influenced access to public education, healthcare, transportation, public venues, and technology inclusion of young disabled children born during that time period.  The ADA was one of the first mandates to impact our lives beyond educational opportunities, and it would be remiss to not share how we benefited from its existence.

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  1. Hateful Anons, Trolls, & Chatrooms: How Cyberbullying Affected Me as a Disabled Person

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    Bullying Prevention Observance Ribbon

    October is National Bullying Prevention Month, and I wanted to share my personal testimony regarding bullying for this observance, and to let others who have endured this that they are not alone.  National Bullying Prevention Month was established in 2006 by the PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center.  This campaign aims to unite communities, local and nationwide, through activities, education, and awareness building during the observance period.  In the month of October, schools and organizations by the hundreds sign up as partners to respond to bullying behaviors that exist and work to shift the way students, parents, and community residents view bullying from being simply “child’s play” or a “rite of passage” to a serious, and at times, life-threatening issue that needs to be addressed.

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  1. September is Sickle Cell Awareness Month

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    Sickle Cell Disease Awareness 1

    September is Sickle Cell Awareness Month, and I decided to show my support by educating my readers about this disease that affects so many in America, and abroad.  As an African American, I am well aware that sickle cell disease hits our community the hardest, and we have to stand in support of those we know and love who live with the symptoms that affect their well-being each and every day.  The purpose of this article is to provide a mini crash course on the most common sickle cell disease, sickle cell anemia, and all that comes along with having this condition.

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